Mark 4:35-41. 35 On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” 36 And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. 37 A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. 38 But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 39 He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. 40 He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” 41 And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

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In the Gospel, Jesus shows his power over nature. He calms the raging sea with a command and sends his disciples wondering what sort of man he is, that even the winds and the sea obey him. The boat has always been seen as representing the Church, which has to make her way around hazards that threaten to drown her. Jesus sleeping through the storm has been applied to the fact that sometimes God seems not to come to the Church’s rescue during persecution. Following the example of the Apostles on the boat, Christians should always seek our Lord’s help, borrowing their words, “Save us, Lord; we are perishing!” It is always when it seems we can bear it no more that Jesus shows his power. He rises and rebukes us for our lack of faith and then calms the storms of our lives. Whenever the storms of worries threaten to wreak havoc in our lives, let us, as St. Augustine advices, knock on the cabin of our heart to awaken the Lord who is asleep in it.

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Commentary of Claretians from Cameroun in http://www.cmfcameroon.com/january-27-st-angela-merici-1470-1540-2/

Immage from http://jeanwilund.com/small-boat-big-storm-sleeping-jesus/